Thursday, April 16, 2015

NBA Season Win Totals

The 2014-15 NBA regular season came to a thrilling end on Wednesday night. While there were numerous games with playoff and seeding implication, there were also games that were very important to gamblers betting on NBA season win totals as the Clippers and Raptors totals were all in play. The Golden State Warriors and Atlanta Hawks easily clinched the top seeds in their respective conferences and the two teams also happened to significantly exceed their projected season win total shown below.

*All lines based on the 10/10 Bovada line. 

TeamBovadaActualDiff.O / U
Atlanta Hawks41.56018.5O
Milwaukee Bucks244117O
Golden State Warriors51.56715.5O
Boston Celtics26.54013.5O
Utah Jazz24.53813.5O
Houston Rockets49.5566.5O
Memphis Grizzlies49556O
Indiana Pacers33385O
New Orleans Pelicans43452O
Portland Trail Blazers49512O
Philadelphia 76ers16.5181.5O
Los Angeles Clippers55.5560.5O
Toronto Raptors48.5490.5O
Sacramento Kings29.529-0.5U
Dallas Mavericks5049-1U
San Antonio Spurs5755-2U
Orlando Magic27.525-2.5U
Detroit Pistons35.532-3.5U
Brooklyn Nets41.538-3.5U
Washington Wizards49.546-3.5U
Chicago Bulls54.550-4.5U
Cleveland Cavaliers58.553-5.5U
Phoenix Suns44.539-5.5U
Miami Heat4437-7U
Minnesota T-Wolves26.516-10.5U
Denver Nuggets41.530-11.5U
Los Angeles Lakers32.521-11.5U
Charlotte Hornets4533-12U
Oklahoma City Thunder57.545-12.5U
New York Knicks4117-24U

The Overs: 

13 NBA teams hit the “over” and beat the line set by Vegas. While the Hawks crushed their total by 18.5 games, it was the Milwaukee Bucks who had the easiest time with their season win total. After winning just 15 games a year ago, the Bucks were only projected to win 24 games. They eclipsed that mark on January 31 with a win against Portland to go 25-22. The Celtics beat their total by 13.5 games mainly due to the superb coaching of Brad Stevens and even the Sixers toppled their 16.5 win projection with 18. Both the Clippers and Raptors were fairly highly touted in the pre-season, but it took until the last game of the season for both of these teams to pass their win total of 55.5 and 48.5 games, respectively. The Clippers won their last seven games all of which they needed to hit the over.

The Unders: 

A whopping 17 teams went “under” the Vegas line which is actually less than the prior season when 18 teams went under led by the Bucks who finished 13.5 games under their projected total. This year’s big winner or should I say loser is to no one’s surprise the New York Knicks. With Melo returning, the Knicks had their win total set at 41 games. They only won 17 on the season and finished just 24 games off the line. Other big losers included the Thunder who were bitten by the injury bug all year and the Hornets who never meshed with Lance Stephenson after a playoff run last year. The Nuggets went under the total by 10.5 games last year and this year wasn’t much different going under by 11.5. Meanwhile, the Cleveland Cavs were projected as the top regular season team in the NBA with 58.5 wins, but they fell short winning 53.

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Nike Hoop Summit Recap

Jamal Murray
photo by Ken Waz / USA Basketball
The Nike Hoop Summit wrapped up Saturday afternoon with a thrilling 103-101 World victory. In a back and forth affair, the World team was able to hold on despite a last second opportunity from Allonzo Trier. Jamal Murray, a Hoop Summit veteran led the way with a game high 30 points and LSU bound Ben Simmons set a Hoop Summit record with nine assists. After a full week of practices there were several players from both the international and U.S. teams that established themselves in the eyes of NBA draft personnel.


Top Tier:

The No. 1 player in the class of 2015 will come down to Ben Simmons and Skal Labissiere. Both players are SEC bound and should challenge for the top draft pick in 2016.

Over the past few weeks, Ben Simmons has hit all parts of the country with the McDonald’s All-American game in Chicago, the Dick’s National Championship in New York, and now the Hoop Summit event in Portland. When Simmons arrived he measured out at 6’10” which was taller than previously expected. In the Friday practice leading up to the game, Simmons turned up the volume and provided a glimpse of how he was going to play in the game on Saturday. In the actual game, Simmons played 30 minutes and finished with 13 points, nine rebounds, and nine assists on 5-10 shooting. Even before entering college, Simmons already has size, strength, and speed to help him excel at the NBA level. The point forward is a strong ball-handler with either hand and always has his head up looking up to find open teammates. His top play came when he pushed the ball down the court out-racing the smaller U.S. defenders finishing with a two-hand dunk. Right now, the main weakness in his game is his outside shooting. Simmons went 0-1 in the game that was played with the international arc, but was comfortable launching shots from this range. He has good rotation on his shot and is already much improved from last year. The Australian native impacts all areas of the game and plays with an unselfish attitude.

While Simmons touched all areas of the scorebook, Skal Labissiere came off the bench and put his own stamp on the game with 21 points, six rebounds, and six blocks on 9-15 shooting in 27 minutes. Throughout the week, Labissiere was the talk of Hoop Summit with NBA GM’s salivating over the chance to draft him in just over a year. After a quiet first half where he scored just four points, Skal dominated the paint in the second half scoring 17 points with a variety of tip-in’s, dunks, and hook shots. The 7 foot Haitian has a smooth game and soft touch that will allow him to become an effective power forward at Kentucky and the next level. He started the game off with a 19 foot jump shot and will eventually excel in the pick and pop world of the NBA. He will need to continue to work on face-up moves out of the post and quick fade-away’s from the right or left block. Despite a tumultuous high school career that was spent changing schools and AAU programs, Skal has poise beyond his years and a game that is pleasing to the eye.

Stock Riser:

He almost didn’t even play in this game, but thanks to Henry Ellenson’s injury, Brandon Ingram was added to the U.S. roster. After erupting at the McDonald’s All-American game, Ingram continued his stellar play and actually led all players on the U.S. with 26 minutes played. He measured out earlier in the week with a 7’3” wing span which so far has offset his relatively thin frame on the defensive end. After a strong week of practice, Ingram started the game showcasing his almost automatic mid-range baseline jump-shot. After six first half points, Ingram got the start in the second half as the U.S. team looked to go smaller to increase the pace of the game. He finished the game with 12 points on 5-6 shooting and contributed three rebounds and a blocked shot. Ingram played the majority of the fourth quarter over Jaylen Brown, but despite being open for several open jumpers the ball never came his way with various ball dominating teammates controlling the action.

International Quick Hitters:

George de Paula (Brazil) – The No. 29 prospect in the DraftExpress rankings had an extremely quiet game despite getting the start at the point guard spot. The 6’6” de Paula is a powerful guard that excels at getting to the basket. Unfortunately in 13 minutes of action, de Paula only took two three pointers. He made his first one early on in the game, but fell extremely short on his other. De Paula also committed three turnovers and didn’t play to his strengths.

Jamal Murray (Canada) – Where will the 6’5” Murray end up next year? Wherever he does, whether it’s in college, Canada, or another destination, Murray will be lighting it up. Last year, Murray scored 10 points in the Hoop Summit game and this year he topped that off with a whopping 30. The best shooter in the game was not fazed by the deeper three point arc and went 3-7 from deep. He scored from all three levels throughout the course of the game and finished 12-23 with five assists. There has been a lot of talk about Murray ending up at Oregon and a backcourt of Murray and Tyler Dorsey would be one of the most explosive in the NCAA.

Cheick Diallo (Mali) – Another high energy performance for Diallo who finished with 12 points and six rebounds after a prior MVP performance at McDonald’s. Diallo chased the ball after misses scoring down low and blocking three shots. College coaches such as Bill Self and Fred Hoiberg are chasing Diallo for next year.

Thon Maker (Canada) – It was a rough Friday for Maker in the scrimmage and a rough game as well. In 14 minutes, Maker scored just two points on free throws and didn’t make a field goal throughout. On the brightside he did add 10 rebounds, five of which were offensive. Right now, Maker’s plans are in flux, but if this game proved anything it’s that he needs time in the weight room and on his offensive skills as he struggled with his shot and on drives to the basket.

Nedim Buza (Bosnia) – The Bosnian sharp-shooter knocked in both of his three point attempts and finished with six points in 13 minutes. Buza was lights out on Friday and if he gets his feet set the outside jumper is probably going in. Buza lacks the necessary foot speed to create his shot and this showed throughout the game.

Frederico Mussini (Italy) – The diminutive Italian guard scored nine points including three clutch free throws at the end. He went 2-5 from the three point line and added in three assists. Mussini is debating about whether to play in college next year, but he could turn into a more than adequate leader for a lucky college team.

Zhou Qi (China) – Qi scored two points and only got one shot attempt, but the intriguing 7’2” center from China showed his assets which include the ability to run the floor and his deficits which include his lack of strength and presence down low on the offensive end. Qi did record two blocks in limited minutes.

Tai Wynyard (New Zealand) – The future Kentucky Wildcat scored his first and only basket on a fundamental post move early on, but wasn’t much of a threat in the other 10 minutes of action. Wynyard could struggle to see the floor when he does land in Lexington given his below the rim style.

Stefan Peno (Serbia) – Peno hit a three in the second half, but usually struggled with the length and athleticism of the opposing players limiting his effectiveness.

U.S. Quick Hitters:

Jaylen Brown – It wasn’t the finest performance for the top rated small forward. Brown struggled with his shot going 2-9 from the floor and was planted on the bench in the deciding minutes. Brown got to the line for six attempts but also committed two turnovers.

Chase Jeter – Jeter got the start and was active around the basket, but finished just 1-5 from the floor. He played 17 minutes and added five rebounds but wasn’t able to utilize his right handed hook shot.

Ivan Rabb – After a strong week of practice, it was a disappointing game for Rabb who played just eight minutes. Rabb went 1-2 from the floor, but he also missed both of his free throws. Earlier in the week, Rabb was hitting jump hooks with both hands but the Oakland native spent the fourth quarter on the bench with Brown.

Malik Newman – Newman went 4-8 from the field and finished with 10 points which was an improvement from his McDonald’s performance, but not the type of game I’m sure he was looking for. Newman scored five points in a row at one stanza which included a three and nice floater. Newman is a streaky scorer and all one has to do is watch his body during a jump shot to determine if it’s going in or not.

Isaiah Briscoe – Nine points and nine assists for Briscoe off the bench, but he also had a costly turnover and missed free throws. Overall, it was an impressive week for the muscular Briscoe and he got to the basket during the course of the game.

Stephen Zimmerman – Zimmerman played up to his potential throughout the game scoring eight points on 4-6 shooting. He put the ball on the floor and finished at the rim and also converted a soft, high arcing deep jump shot. Zimm struggled a bit during the U.S. practices but he shined in his 17 minutes of game action.

Luke Kennard – In a surprising performance, Luke Kennard led the U.S. in scoring with 22 points and shot attempts with 18. Kennard hit 2-5 from three and was all over the court throughout the game scoring at the rim and with pull-up jump shots. He started to hunt for his shot a little bit too much at the end, but was also the most aggressive player on the U.S. team.

Caleb Swanigan – Swanigan received limited minutes and struggled with the length of the World team. The future Michigan State big man went 1-4, but added three rebounds.


Allonzo Trier – Trier provided one of the key highlights with an impressive two hand dunk in the first quarter and was tasked with the last shot for the U.S. team. Trier missed the last shot badly, but that shouldn’t sour the fact that his scoring abilities were on display all week along with his deep range. 

Nike Hoop Summit: Friday Rewind

The Nike Hoop Summit practices concluded on Friday as both the World and U.S. team made their final preparations for their match-up on Saturday afternoon. The U.S. team had both a morning and evening practice while the World team had a single practice in the afternoon.

World Team:

Skal - Ken Nowaczyk/USA Basketball
NBA scouts and General Managers were out in full force to watch the World team Saturday afternoon. The long and talented team wasted no time in picking up the energy in the practice as they started with full-court shooting drills to get warmed up. It only took a few jump shots from Kentucky bound Skal Labissiere to see his immense potential and to understand why he might finish as the No. 1 ranked player in his class. Standing around 7 feet, Labissiere moves well and stays square to the basket on his jumpers. He gets good elevation and has a high release point allowing his shots to fall softly through the net. After getting warmed up, the World team went right to scrimmaging.


To start the game, the team was divided up with Jamal Murray, Stefan Peno, Ben Simmons, Thon Maker, and Zhou Qi on one team and Federico Mussini, George de Paula, Nedim Buza, Skal Labissiere, and Cheick Diallo on another. 2016 Kentucky bound forward Tai Wynyard came off the bench.

Team 1:

Right away, small forward Ben Simmons made his presence known. Without a true point guard on the team, Simmons handled the ball a fair amount and initiated the fast break after grabbing his own defensive rebounds. He knocked in a NBA three-pointer from the right corner to kick things off and then scored on two strong drives to the basket. He had a quickness advantage on Nedim Buza and used just one or two dribbles to get Buza off balance before accelerating down the left lane and finishing short runners with both his left and right hand. Throughout the game, Simmons was blazing in transition and also converted a nice finger roll after a drive down the middle of the lane.

Along with Simmons, Canadian shooting guard Jamal Murray showed off his deep range hitting multiple three’s proving that the deeper three point line did not make a difference. 7 foot forward Thon Maker struggled throughout the scrimmages before throwing down a rim rattling one hand dunk towards the end. Maker prefers to play outside the paint; however on Friday his shot was not falling and he struggled driving to the basket. While Maker has range on his shot, his misses were all over the side of the rim rather than falling short or long. 7’2” center Zhou Qi from China made a return appearance after missing numerous practices due to an ankle injury suffered on the first day of practice. Qi showed his ability to get up and down the floor well for a player his size and held his own on the defensive boards. Given his lack of upper body strength and 209 pound frame, Qi was not banging around down low on the offensive end. Qi prefers to hover around the foul line area looking for short jump shots which he can knock down given his shooting touch.

Team 2:

I came to see Skal. Both the media and NBA personnel have fallen in love with the power forward from Haiti and while it was a quite performance from the future star you could see why basketball minds are enamored with him. Skal waited until the last stanza to score a basket and did so with a right handed hook shot in the lane and he followed that up with a left-handed tip dunk in the middle of the lane where his whole forearm was above the rim. One area where he could have been more aggressive was when he caught the ball at the free throw line against a zone defense. He had several opportunities to turn and shoot from 10-12 feet but instead he passed on those open looks.

6’1”, 154 pound Federico Mussini and the 6’6” George de Paula ran the team’s offense with their contrasting styles. Mussini is short and quick and can knock in three’s from deep and get by his man off the dribble. Once past his defender, Mussini’s physical deficiencies come into play and he is often driving looking for an open teammate to kick the ball to. On the other hand, de Paula is strong and athletic and will try to use his almost 7 foot wing span to dunk on a defender’s head (which he tried). De Paula was aggressive in the scrimmages, but sometimes to the detriment of his teammates who often became upset with his lack of passing. In the first two scrimmages, de Paula took several forced jump shots and shooting is definitely not his forte. When he is driving and attacking he is a tough cover but not when shooting long and contested jump shots.

6’8” wing Nedim Buza put together a thrilling shooting display during the scrimmages knocking down deep three’s whenever his feet were set and he had some space. Buza has good lift on his outside shot and his attempts were always straight on-line with the basket. While he proved to be a knock down shooter, it was also clear that creating his own shot was not his forte. Lacking foot speed, Buza needed high picks to free him of a defender before launching a jumper.

Throughout the scrimmages the world team looked crisp. They worked on attacking the full-court press and zone defenses that the U.S. will most likely throw at them on Saturday. The U.S. will put pressure on the guards and look to speed the game up. Look for Ben Simmons to have a huge role in helping the World team combat the aggressiveness of the U.S.

U.S. Team:

The United States had two practices on Friday. The morning session consisted primarily of shooting drills and other team competitions while the evening practice featured another scrimmage against former college players. This time around the scrimmage consisted of three, 10 minute quarters.
This time around, small forward Jaylen Brown was ready to participate and took over the starting small forward spot from Brandon Ingram. The starters were Jalen Brunson, Malik Newman, Brown, Ivan Rabb, and Stephen Zimmerman. Unlike Thursday where the U.S. basically went five in and five out, substitutions were made in a more liberal manner.

Brown did not waste any time getting started making a driving lay-up, a corner jump shot from the right side of the court, and another lay-up in traffic. Throughout the course of the scrimmage Brown played primarily small forward, but also saw some time at the power forward spot where he was banging around down low with the taller and stronger opponents. In the last stanza, Brown made another driving lay-up and finished a short floater from the left side of the basket after drawing contact.

Shooting guard Malik Newman had an up and done scrimmage despite a variety of shot attempts. He was best in the open court attacking the basket and converted a few jumpers throughout but also miss-fired on several long two’s. It wasn’t an efficient performance for Newman, but it was quite the performance for Luke Kennard. One of the first players off the bench, Kennard scored a quick three baskets with a follow-up off a missed shot, a two dribble jumper from the right corner, and a cutting lay-up off of a nice feed from Briscoe. After his quick burst, Kennard sat out the rest of the scrimmage opting for some rest before the real game on Saturday.

The U.S. team also received some strong bench play with Isaiah Briscoe, Allonzo Trier, and Brandon Ingram all making plays. Briscoe continued his attacking style and even added a three in from the left wing. Trier had his soft, high arcing shot working throughout and Ingram was able to pick his spots with a few mid-range jumpers and a put back after a miss from five feet out. As for the U.S. big men, Ivan Rabb was the most active hitting short shots with both hands and relishing the contact with the former college players.

Match-Up:


The 2015 Nike Hoop Summit tips at 3pm EST on ESPN2. Last year the U.S. team won 84-73 behind the eventual trio that led Duke to the 2015 NCAA championship. Justise Winslow led the way with 16 points and Jahlil Okafor and Tyus Jones scored 14 and 13, respectively. This year, the U.S. guards will look to set the tempo and pressure the World team into turnovers. The World team has good height and length. Will Ben Simmons and Skal Labissiere lead the World team to a victory or will Malik Newman, Jaylen Brown, or Allonzo Trier step up for the U.S.?

Friday, April 10, 2015

Nike Hoop Summit: US Scrimmage

The Nike Hoop Summit is underway in Portland, OR this week and Thursday marked the third day of practice for the U.S. team. The early afternoon consisted of putting in plays and some light scrimmaging as the team saved up for the 6-8pm session. In this stanza, the U.S. team scrimmaged for four, 10 minute quarters against a variety of players from Portland University and other local schools in addition to future Oklahoma Sooner, Payton Pritchard (class of 2016). It also happened to be the only practice that NBA scouts could attend for the U.S. team and the gym was packed with over 100 scouts and General Managers. The U.S. team used its length and athleticism to combat its strength disadvantage and won the first three quarters comfortable before squeaking out a fourth quarter victory.

The starters included Jalen Brunson, Malik Newman, Brandon Ingram, Ivan Rabb, and Stephen Zimmerman. 

Guards:

Malik Newman – Newman got the start alongside Jalen Brunson and showcased his scoring ability throughout. Without being tasked to start the offense, Newman was free to attack the basket and look for mid-range jump shots within half-court offensive sets. He started the scrimmage off with a three from the left wing and added in a step-back jumper. In the second half Newman put up points in a hurry scoring off a pick and roll and using screens to find open 17 foot jump shots. The uncommitted guard was one of the top performers on the day and used his first quick step to constantly free himself from his defender.

Allonzo Trier – The future Arizona Wildcat was the leading scorer for the U.S. with 20 points including an and one three to win a sluggish fourth quarter for the U.S. Trier hit several three’s from the wing and looked comfortable several feet behind the arc. Trier’s ability to get to the rim against more athletic defenders has been questioned but he displayed a good bounce off the dribble and was at ease finding his shot.

Briscoe drives against Pritchard - photo by Ken Waz
Isaiah Briscoe – The powerful combo guard was manning the point guard position when he was in the game. He used his upper body strength and in and out dribble to constantly get deep into the lane where he was able to use his wing span to convert lay-ups or dish out to open teammates. Briscoe was intense on defense and put the most pressure on Pritchard when he was handling the ball. In addition to his baskets close to the hoop, Briscoe converted a long two from the left corner in the second half.

Luke Kennard – Throughout the course of the game, Kennard was the best defensive rebounding guard. He got off the ground quickly and is a good two-footed jumper which he also displayed when going for two-handed jams on various fastbreak attempts. Kennard knocked in several three’s, but struggled when he had to put the ball on the floor. He has a good first burst, but is hampered after one dribble when going towards the basket.  

Jalen Brunson – It wasn't a great scoring day for Brunson although he found the basket several times in the second half. His outside shot was off, but ran the offense well and minimized turnovers. Brunson played stellar defense on Pritchard picking him off twice and showed good instincts in intercepting a few other passes.

Small Forwards:

Brandon Ingram – The rising senior prospect started for the U.S. and finished with 13 points. He got to the line in both halves by attacking the basket and converted 7-8 from the line. He miss-fired on his three point attempts but knocked in a 12 foot jump shot after a pick and roll with Brunson in the second. Ingram used his length to block several jump shots as well on the defensive end. He didn't play as well as he did at McDonald’s, but he still looked comfortable and confident in his surroundings. Over the next few months he will need to continue to work on his strength and explosiveness as the fouls he drew today could have easily turned into blocks or missed shots against more athletic players.

Jaylen Brown – After participating in drills to start the practice, Brown was held out of the scrimmage with a sore hip.

Big Men:

Ivan Rabb – Over the last year, Rabb has worked on his body to get stronger and healthier. After winning a California state championship, Rabb’s effort has been top tier over the past two weeks. He scored close to the rim in the first half with both hands. He also displayed his passing ability with several touch passes to open teammates and operated well at the top of the key. Rabb was forced into a few contested shots in the second half going against stronger defenders and he noted that continuing to get in the weight room was one of his priorities.

Stephen Zimmerman – Big Zimm had a strong run in the second quarter scoring nine points in a quick burst. He converted a touch pass from Rabb and finished close to the rim including an and-one. While he scored in a hurry in this quarter he was also challenged by the physical play and struggled to score with the ball in his hands. He also didn’t get a chance to showcase his 12-15 foot jump shot during the course of the game.

Chase Jeter – The future Duke tandem of Kennard and Jeter connected several times for baskets including one where Kennard took the ball up the court and after attacking the basket he dished out to Jeter for a swish from the foul line extended. Jeter used his go-to move (right hook) to score in the second quarter.

Caleb Swanigan – Swanigan scored three points in the first half and struggled to convert down low; however he used his upper body to keep the opposing post players out of the paint and also man handled a smaller defender down low in the fourth quarter. He stepped outside the paint twice miss-firing on both of his jumpers which he was knocking down in the McDonald’s practices. Swanigan has the power to bang with college players but will need to work on his explosiveness off of two feet.


The U.S. won the first quarter 27-14, the second quarter 34-21, and the third quarter 31-15. With both teams looking tired the fourth quarter it was an issue getting the ball in the hoop on both sides. Down 15-12, Allonzo Trier hit a three from the top of the key and got fouled with two seconds left providing the U.S. with a 16-15 win. While not on the U.S. team, Payton Pritchard relished the opportunity to go against the older U.S. players. When he walked in the gym, the scouts were buzzing about the performance he put on a year ago in the Hoop Summit scrimmage despite being just a sophomore. While he struggled from the floor, he displayed good ball-handlings skills and was constantly getting into the paint showing good body control and an ability to avoid getting his shot blocked by the U.S. big men.

Monday, March 30, 2015

McDonald's All-American Practice Report

It did not take long for the action to heat up inside the Quest Multiplex in Chicago, IL this morning. The McDonald’s All-American festivities began on Sunday, but the practice on Monday served as the first gathering for all team members. With media and NBA personnel on hand, both the East and West teams were going at it from the get go. The two hour practice provided an in-depth look at the top seniors in the country and while all eyes were initially on Ben Simmons and Jaylen Brown they quickly shifted to the surprise performer of the day.

West Team:

The West team is coached by Chicago’s own, Robert Smith from perennial power Simeon. He had the West team in 3 on 2 and 2 on 1 drills right off the bat which quickly led to intense one on one battles. The strength of the West team lies in there abundance of talented big men, but the perimeter players certainly proved their worth as well.

Team A:                                                                       Team B:
Malik Newman (Undecided)                                       Jalen Brunson (Villanova)
Perry Dozier (South Carolina)                                    Allonzo Trier (Arizona)
Brandon Ingram (Undecided)                                     Malachi Richardson (Syracuse)
Ivan Rabb (Undecided)                                              Deyonta Davis (Michigan State)
Caleb Swanigan (Undecided)                                    Stephen Zimmerman (Undecided)
Chase Jeter (Duke)                                                    Carlton Bragg (Kansas)

Standout Performer:

Brandon Ingram, 6’8”, SF, Kinston (NC)

The long and lanky Kinston, NC native had his coming out party back in early July in Chicago at the Adidas Unrivaled camp and he certainly did not miss a beat during the Monday practice session. Faced off with sweet shooting Malachi Richardson, Ingram was the one that had his jumper working. Extremely comfortable from 12-15 feet, Ingram’s feathery shot found the net numerous times from mid-range coming off the catch, the dribble, and pick and rolls. Even in drills it was hard for Ingram to miss from this area and given his height and length he got the shot off almost anytime he wanted. His range also extended out to the three point line as he hit several three’s during the half-court and full-court scrimmages. On the defensive side of the ball, Ingram struggled at times staying in front of his opponent whether it was in one-one-one drills or scrimmages, but his length helped negate any ground he gave up. With a long wing-span, Ingram was able to disrupt shots and also created numerous steals by getting his hands in the passing lane. The early eyes were on Jaylen Brown and Ben Simmons, but it was Brandon Ingram that continued his stellar play at the Quest Multiplex.


Top Performers:

Malik Newman, 6’4”, G, Callaway (MS)

While still not a pure point guard, Newman ran the point guard position for his team and faced off against Villanova bound Jalen Brunson. Newman used his speed and athleticism to hit difficult shots in the paint and used the pick and roll to get space for his floater or jump shot. He was also able to attack the basket and was aggressive on the boards as well. He never seemed to catch fire, but anytime he missed from the field it was almost certain that Newman would find a way to knock down his next shot.

Ivan Rabb, 6’10”, PF, Bishop O’ Dowd (CA)

Last year it was Stanley Johnson that led his Mater Dei team to a California state championship and then immediate flew to Chicago for the McDonald’s All-American practices. This year it’s big man Ivan Rabb. On Saturday night, Rabb knocked in the game winning free throw to win a state title and just two days later he was one of the most energetic players on the court. He ripped down rebounds, hit a few soft shots in the paint with both hands, and threw down an emphatic two hand dunk on fellow teammate Stephen Zimmerman. Right now Rabb is healthy and it showed in his play and early effort level.

Top Match-Up:

Caleb Swanigan vs. Stephen Zimmerman

There was a lot to like when it came to the various big men match-ups on the West side, but watching the contrasting styles of Swanigan and Zimmerman was the most entertaining. At 6’8”, Swanigan is a bull in a china shop while the almost 7 foot Zimmerman prefers to use his soft touch outside. Throughout the practice, Swanigan had trouble scoring on his first attempt in the post and was routinely getting his shot blocked. Despite a failed first attempt, he almost always managed to coral the loose ball and go up for a second or third attempt until he finished the play. Zimmerman had his share of blocks, but Swanigan would eventually manage to use his strength to get the basket. On the other side, Zimmerman was playing loose and knocking down outside jump shots. He scored in the post at times, but the four-time state champ was enjoying the open looks he was getting at the top of the key. At the end, this match-up was basically deemed a draw, with Swanigan getting the better of Zimmerman on the inside and vice versa on the outside.

Other Notes:
·         Point guard Jalen Brunson is the lone player from Illinois in the all-star game this year and also the only true point guard on the West side. Throughout the practice, Brunson was a smooth floor general and used quick in-and-out moves to get to the basket. He miss-fired on several lay-ups in the paint early on, but settled down knocking in a few outside shots.

·         Perry Dozier, the 6’6” wing from South Carolina was the sneaky good player of the day. Surrounded by more heralded players, Dozier picked his spots and showed off his smooth and refined game. He utilized the pick and roll well and hit several 15 foot jumpers along with soft floaters in the paint. Dozier did not look as comfortable from the three point line, but his length and ball-handling skills were certainly impressive.

·         Future Michigan State Spartan, Deyonta Davis did not get a lot of half-court action, but the 6’9” power forward did manage to hit two deep jumpers from the top of the key. A bouncy prospect, it looked like Davis had also added some mass to his upper body while going through his senior year.


East Team:
Team A:                                                                               Team B:
Isaiah Briscoe (Kentucky)                                             Jawun Evans (Oklahoma State)
Antonio Blakeney (LSU)                                               Luke Kennard (Duke)
Jaylen Brown (Undecided)                                            Dwayne Bacon (Florida State)
Ben Simmons (LSU)                                                     Dedric Lawson (Memphis)
Diamond Stone (Maryland)                                          Cheick Diallo (Undecided)
                                                                                      Thomas Bryant (Undecided)

The East team has the superstar combo of Jaylen Brown and Ben Simmons and early on both were competing in one on one half-court and full-court drills. The smooth nature of Simmons’ game was on display as was the power and brute force from Jaylen Brown. Early on, it was Brown that was looking good knocking in outside shots and corralling rebounds, but then he started to get sloppy with the ball and turned it over several times. He did finish with some rim rattling dunks, but also came up short on several of his contested jump shots. Simmons showed off his passing skills, but didn’t look comfortable shooting from the outside and did not exert his dominance on the game.

Top Players:

Thomas Bryant, 6’9”, C, Huntington Prep (WV)

It was a fairly productive morning for the 6’9” Bryant who always has his motor running on high. Looking a little smoother than normal, Bryant was knocking in deep jump shots during the skills portion of the practice which continued into the scrimmages (even though this led to one or two forced shots). Bryant was active on the boards and defended Diamond Stone well towards the end.

Antonio Blakeney, 6’4”, SG, Oak Ridge (FL)

As one of the top scorers on the East team, Blakeney had his outside shot finding the bottom of the net and was also soaring down the lane for two handed dunks on the break. Blakeney minimized the amount of tough shots he normally takes and also put pressure on Luke Kennard when guarding him in the half-court set.

Other Notes:

·         Diamond Stone started the practice off strong hitting a short hook with his left hand and following that up with a longer hook with his right. Stone was confident when going at Bryant and Cheick Diallo in the drills and held his own on the defensive end. About half way through, Stone was still getting open looks but he his jump shots started careening towards the side of the rim and he failed to finish down low.

·         Despite not shining, Brown easily got the better of Dwayne Bacon who was quiet up until the last few minutes. Brown used his first step to get his should ahead of Bacon and then was able to finish with contact in the lane. He also sought out defensive rebounds calling them his out loud before actually wrapping them up.

·         Isaiah Briscoe and Jawun Evans were matched up throughout the practice. Evans used his speed to push the pace and was feisty on defense. On occasion, Evans would slither into the paint and was able to finish with a floater or soft lay-up. Then there was Briscoe who used his grown man strength to attack the basket and finish with contact. He struggled shooting from the outside, but was routinely at the rim converting shots or dishing to open teammates.

Overall:

Both the East and West practices were intense with a lot of action. The talented players went at each other time and time again and while there were several fine performances, it was the lights out shooting of Brandon Ingram that had everyone talking once the final buzzer sounded.


Saturday, March 28, 2015

Diamond Stone's Surprise: Heading To Maryland

Maryland exceeded expectations this past season going 28-7 in their first year in the Big 10 and now they've exceeded expectations on the recruiting front with the unexpected commitment of five-star center Diamond Stone. The 6’10” big man from Milwaukee committed to Maryland on Friday night and in turn significantly raised expectations for the Terps in 2015-16.

Diamond Stone - Maryland
Diamond Stone’s name first popped on the radar early on in 2012 as he established himself as one of the top players in his class back as an overpowering freshman. He won a Wisconsin Division 4 championship during his first year of high school and just capped off his fourth title in a row at Dominican high school with a 23 point, 15 rebound performance over a week ago. Through it all, Stone maintained his status as one of the top players in his class while holding down the No. 1 ranking at times and is now considered a consensus top five player.


Over the past two summers, Stone was a regular with the USA basketball program and won gold medals in 2013 at the U16 FIBA Americas and in 2014 at the U17 FIBA World Championship. He started all 12 games for the U.S. and averaged 13.6 points and 7.2 rebounds in 2013 and 13.4 points and 9.7 rebounds this past summer.  

Recruitment:
Stone’s recruitment is similar to that of a long, windy road with many twists and turns. Wisconsin and Marquette established themselves early on in Stone’s recruitment. Buzz Williams and Bo Ryan were both seen all over Wisconsin watching Stone’s high school and AAU teams play. Marquette was rumored to be the early leader with Stone taking numerous unofficial visits to the campus right next door. Soon schools from all over the country joined in the race as Stone racked up offers from Georgetown, Indiana, and UCLA. It wasn’t long before the two Tobacco Road powers entered the scene with both Duke and North Carolina extending offers. Both Coach K and Roy Williams took multiple trips up to Wisconsin during Stone’s junior year, but neither one made the final four cut. As soon as Buzz left for Virginia Tech, Marquette dropped out (as they also received a commitment from Henry Ellenson). The four schools that remained were Wisconsin, Connecticut, Oklahoma State, and Maryland. To most pundits, Maryland was the surprise pick and seemed like a long shot. Just this past summer it seemed as though UConn was the leader and the much discussed package deal with Malik Newman was in play. In October, Stone took official visits to all four schools, but it was Mark Turgeon and the Terps that won out in the end.

While Stone’s recruitment has been extremely tight lipped over the years, there appear to be two logical reasons for Stone’s commitment. For one, the Terps are now a Big 10 school and travel throughout the Midwest but more importantly they are an Under Armour program. Stone has played on the Under Armour AAU circuit the past few years with the apparel company sponsoring the Young Legends from Milwaukee, which is a team that was started by Stone’s father. This year the Young Legends will have their 16U team competing in the Under Armour Association. Maryland made a strong push two years ago for the Harrison twins using their Under Armour connection, but now they have landed their highest rated recruit in recent memory.

Maryland:
After going 9-9 in the ACC and missing the NCAA tournament in 2014, the Terps suffered a tumultuous off-season losing five players to transfer including starting guard Seth Allen and big man Charles Mitchell. The Terps brought in a strong freshmen class to offset the transfers and Melo Trimble, the Washington Post All-Met Player of the Year exceeded all expectations as he led the team in scoring with 16.2 points per game. The Terps shocked Iowa State early on in the season and then went into East Lansing in their first Big 10 game and emerged victorious. While they went down in the Round of 32 to West Virginia, the Terps really only lose their second leading scorer in Dez Wells and guard Richard Pauk who averaged under six points a game. With Trimble returning, the Terps will have some fire power to go along with a smooth shooting sophomore Jared Nickens and a potential first round draft pick in Jake Layman. In addition to Stone, the Terps return sophomore Damonte Dodd, freshman Michal Cekovsky, and gain the services of former Georgia Tech big man Robert Carter. The future is bright in College Park as the Terps look to take over the top spot in the Big 10.

Stone Analysis:

At 6’10”, 246 pounds, Stone is the most complete low post player in the 2015 class. While people should not expect him to put up Jahlil Okafor numbers, Stone is similar to the current top freshman in the country in that they both know their strengths lie down low. Stone has a good set of hands when passes are sent his way and impressive footwork as well. His ability to score with both his right and left hands allows him to convert on jump hooks and up and unders around the basket. While Stone prefers to score close to the basket he is comfortable banking in shots from outside the key and stepping out to 12-15 feet. He has displayed the ability to knock in three’s, but he likely won’t be taking many in college. Stone’s energy level and explosiveness are question marks, but he has shown improvements in both areas recently. A reasonable expectation for Stone’s freshman season would be that of Myles Turner and not Okafor. Turner averaged 10.6 points and 6.5 rebounds a game at Texas this past season which Stone could possibly push to 12 points and seven boards a game. If Stone does that combined with Trimble’s exploits, then Maryland will definitely be playing until at least the second week of the tournament next season.


Friday, March 13, 2015

Conference Awards Listing

America East

Player of the Year:
Jameel Warney, Jr., Stony Brook

First-Team All-Conference 
Sam Rowley, Sr., Albany
Evan Singletary, Jr., Albany
Jameel Warney, Jr., Stony Brook
Carson Puriefoy, Jr., Stony Brook 
Ethan O’Day, Jr., Vermont

Defensive Player of the Year:
Jameel Warney, Jr., Stony Brook

Coach of the Year:
Will Brown, Albany

Freshman of the Year:
Tanner Leissner, Fr., Forward, New Hampshire

AAC

Player of the Year:

First-Team All-Conference:
Ryan Boatright, G, UConn
Nic Moore, G, SMU
Austin Nichols, F, Memphis
Will Cummings, G, Temple
James Woodard, G, Tulsa

Defensive Player of the Year:
Amida Brimah, C, UConn

Coach of the Year:
Fran Dumphy, Temple

Freshman of the Year:
Daniel Hamilton, F, UConn

Atlantic 10

Player of the Year:
Tyler Kalinoski, Davidson

First-Team All-Conference:
Tyler Kalinoski, Davidson
Jordan Sibert, Dayton
Kendall Anthony, Richmond
DeAndre Bembry, Saint Joseph
Treveon Graham

Defensive Player of the Year:
Briante Weber, VCU

Coach of the Year:
Bob McKillop, Davidson

Freshman of the Year:
Eric Paschall, Fordham

ACC

Player of the Year:
Jahlil Okafor, Fr., Duke

First-Team All-Conference:
Jahlil Okafor, Fr., Duke
Jerian Grant, Sr., Notre Dame
Rakeem Christmas, Gr. Syracuse
Malcolm Brogdon, Jr., Virginia
Olivier Hanlan, Jr., Boston College

Defensive Player of the Year:
Darion Atkins, Virginia

Coach of the Year:
Tony Bennett, Virginia

Freshman of the Year:
Jahlil Okafor, Duke

Atlantic Sun

Player of the Year:
Ty Greene, USC Upstate

First-Team All-Conference:
Ty Greene, USC Upstate
Beau Beech, North Florida
Brett Comer, FGCU
Josh Williams, Lipscomb
Dallas More, North Florida

Coach of the Year:
Matthew Driscoll, North Florida

Freshman of the Year:
Tayler Person, Northern Kentucky

Big East

Player of the Year:
Kris Dunn, G, Providence
Ryan Arcidiacono, G, Villanova

First-Team All-Conference:
Kris Dunn, G, Providence
Ryan Arcidiacono, G, Villanova
Kellen Dunham, G, Butler
D’Vauntes Smith-Rivera, G, Georgetown
LaDontae Henton, F, Providence
D’Angelo Harrison, G, St. John’s
Darrun Hilliard, G, Villanova

Defensive Player of the Year:
Kris Dunn, G, Providence

Coach of the Year:
Jay Wright, Villanova

Freshman of the Year:
Angel Delgado, C, Seton Hall

Big Sky

Player of the Year:
Mikh McKinney, Sacramento State

First-Team All-Conference:
Mikh McKinney, Sacramento State
Tyler Harvey, Eastern Washington
Martin Breunig, Montana
Kris Yanku, Northern Arizona
Jordan Gregory, Montana
Venky Jois, Eastern Washington

Defensive Player of the Year:
Jordyn Martin, Northern Arizona

Coach of the Year:
Jim Hayford, Eastern Washington
Brian Katz, Sacramento State

Freshman of the Year:
Bogdan Bliznyuk, Eastern Washington

Big South

Player of the Year:
Saah Nimley, G, Sr., Charleston Southern

First-Team All-Conference
Saah Nimley, G, Sr., Charleston Southern
John Brown, F, R-Jr., High Point
Jerome Hill, F, Jr., Gardner-Webb
Javonte Green, F, Sr., Radford
Keon Moore, G, R-Sr., Winthrop
Defensive Player of the Year:
Javonte Green, F, Sr., Radford

Coach of the Year:
Barclay Radebaugh, Charleston Southern

Freshman of the Year:
DeSean Murray, F, Presbyterian College

Big Ten

Player of the Year:
Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin

First-Team All-Conference:
Frank Kaminsky, F, Wisconsin
D’Angelo Russell, G, Ohio State
Yogi Ferrell, G, Indiana
Aaron White, F, Iowa
Melo Trimble, G, Maryland

Defensive Player of the Year:
Rapheal Davis, Purdue

Coach of the Year:
Bo Ryan, Wisconsin
Mark Turgeon, Maryland

Freshman of the Year:
D’Angelo Russell, Ohio State

Big XII

Player of the Year:
Buddy Hield, Oklahoma

First-Team All-Conference:
Rico Gathers, F, Baylor
Georges Niang, F, Iowa State
Perry Ellis, F, Kansas
Buddy Hield, G, Oklahoma
Juwan Staten, G, West Virginia

Defensive Player of the Year:
Jameel McKay, Iowa State

Coach of the Year:
Bob Huggins, West Virginia

Freshman of the Year:
Myles Turner, Texas

Big West

Player of the Year:
Corey Hawkins, UC Davis

First-Team All-Conference:
Corey Hawkins, G, UC Davis
Alan Williams, C, UCSB
Michael Bryson, G, UCSB
Will Davis II, F, UC Irvine
Taylor Johns, F, UC Riverside

Defensive Player of the Year:
Roderick Bobbitt, Hawaii

Coach of the Year:
Jim Les, UC Davis

Freshman of the Year:
Gabe Vincent, UC Santa Barbara

CAA

Player of the Year:
Marcus Thornton, William & Mary

First-Team All-Conference:
Marcus Thornton, G, William and Mary
Scott Eatherton, F, Northeastern
Juan’ya Green, G, Hofstra
Damion Lee, G, Drexel
Addison Spruill, G, UNCW

Defensive Player of the Year:
Terry Tarpey, William & Mary

Coach of the Year:
Kevin Keatts, UNC-Wilmington

Freshman of the Year:
Elijah Bryant, Elon

Conference USA

Player of the Year:
Speedy Smith, Louisiana Tech

First-Team All-Conference:
Speedy Smith, Louisiana Tech
Vince Hunter, UTEP
Jeromie Hill, UTSA
T.J. Price, Western Kentucky
Trey Freeman, Old Dominion
Defensive Player of the Year:

Defensive Player of the Year:
Julian Washburn, UTEP

Coach of the Year:
Michael White, Louisiana Tech

Freshman of the Year:
Torin Dorn, Charlotte

Horizon League

Player of the Year:
Keifer Sykes, Green Bay (Sr., G)

First-Team All-Conference:
Keifer Sykes, Green Bay (Sr., G)
Kahlil Felder, Oakland (So., G)
Alec Peters, Valparaiso (So., F)
Anton Grady, Cleveland State (Jr., F)
Trey Lewis, Cleveland State (Jr., G)
Defensive Player of the Year:
Vashil Fernandez, Valparaiso

Coach of the Year:
Bryce Drew, Valparaiso

Freshman of the Year:
Paris Bass, Detroit

IVY

Player of the Year:
Justin Sears, F, Yale

First-Team All-Conference:
Justin Sears, F, Yale
Maodo Lo, G, Columbia
Wesley Saunders, G, Harvard
Javier Duren, G, Yale
Shonn Miller, F, Cornell

Defensive Player of the Year:
Steve Moundou-Missi, F, Harvard

Coach of the Year:
James Jones, Yale

Freshman of the Year:
Miles Wright, G, Dartmouth


MAAC:

Player of the Year:
David Laury, F, Iona

First-Team All-Conference:
David Laury, F, Iona
A.J. English, G, Iona
Emmy Andujar, F, Manhattan
Justin Robinson, G, Monmouth
Zaid Hearst, G, Quinnipiac
Matt Lopez, C, Rider

Defensive Player of the Year:
Ousmane Drame, F, Quinnipiac

Coach of the Year:
Kevin Baggett, Rider

Freshman of the Year:
Schadrac Casimir, G, Iona

MAC:

Player of the Year:
Justin Moss, F, Buffalo

First-Team All-Conference:
Richaun Holmes, F, Bowling Green
Justin Moss, F, Buffalo
Chris Fowler, G, Central Michigan
Jimmy Hall, F, Kent State
Julius Brown, G, Toledo

Defensive Player of the Year:
Richaun Holmes, Bowling Green

Coach of the Year:
Keno Davis, Central Michigan

Freshman of the Year:
Sean Sellers, Ball State

MEAC:

Player of the Year:
Kendall Gray, Delaware State

First-Team All-Conference:
Jeff Short, G, Norfolk State
Nimrod Hilliard, G, North Carolina Central
Amere May, G/F, Delaware State
James Carlton, F, Howard
Kendall Gray, C, Delaware State

Defensive Player of the Year:
Kendall Gray, Delaware State

Coach of the Year:
Bobby Collins, Maryland Eastern Shore

Freshman of the Year:
Ryan Andino, Maryland Eastern Shore

MVC

Player of the Year:
Seth Tuttle, UNI Sr.

First-Team All-Conference:
Ron Baker, Wichita State Jr. 
D.J. Balentine, Evansville Jr. 
Egidijus Mockevicius, UE Jr. 
Seth Tuttle, UNI Sr.
Fred VanVleet, Wichita St. Jr. 

Defensive Player of the Year:
Tekele Cotton, Wichita State

Coach of the Year:
Ben Jacobson, Northern Iowa

Freshman of the Year:
Brenton Scott, Indiana State

Mountain West

Player of the Year:
Derrick Marks, Sr., Boise State

First-Team All-Conference:
Derrick Marks, Sr., Boise State
Larry Nance Jr., Sr., Wyoming
J.J. Avila, Sr., Colorado State
Christian Wood, So., UNLV
Marvelle Harris, Jr., Fresno State

Defensive Player of the Year:
Skylar Spencer, Jr., San Diego State

Coach of the Year:
Leon Rice, Boise State

Freshman of the Year:
David Collette, Utah State

NEC

Player of the Year:
Karvel Anderson Robert Morris G 6-2 190 Sr

First-Team All-Conference:
Karvel Anderson Robert Morris G 6-2 190 Sr
Jason Brickman LIU Brooklyn G 6-0 165 Sr
Jalen Cannon St. Francis Brooklyn F 6-6 230 Jr
Alex Francis Bryant F 6-6 205 Sr
Sidney Sanders, Jr. Fairleigh Dickinson G 5-11 175 Sr

Defensive Player of the Year:
Kenneth Ortiz Wagner G 6-0 200 Sr

Coach of the Year:
Andrew Toole Robert Morris

Freshman of the Year:
Malik Harmon Saint Francis U G 5-11 194 Fr

OVC

Player of the Year:
Cameron Payne, Murray State

First-Team All-Conference:
Cameron Payne, Murray State
Corey Walden, Eastern Kentucky
Craig Bradshaw, Belmont
Jarvis Williams, Murray State
Eric Stutz, Eastern Kentucky

Defensive Player of the Year:
Corey Walden, Eastern Kentucky

Coach of the Year:
Cornell Johnston, Eastern Illinois
Steve Prohm, Murray State

Freshman of the Year:

PAC-12

Player of the Year:
Joseph Young, G, Oregon

First-Team All-Conference:
Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, F, Arizona
Stanley Johnson, F, Arizona,
DaVonte Lacy, G, Washington State
T.J. McConnell, G, Arizona
Gary Payton II, G, Arizona
Norman Powell, G, UCLA
Chasson Randle, G, Stanford
Tyrone Wallace, G, California
Delon Wright, G, Utah
Joseph Young, G, Oregon

Defensive Player of the Year:
Gary Payton II, G, Oregon State

Coach of the Year:
Dana Altman, Oregon

Freshman of the Year:
Stanley Johnson, F, Arizona

Patriot

Player of the Year:
Tim Kempton, Lehigh (So., F/C)

First-Team All-Conference:
Chris Hass, Bucknell (Jr., G)
Tim Kempton, Lehigh (So., F/C)*
Damon Sherman-Newsome, Colgate (Sr., G)
Worth Smith, Navy (Sr., F)
Dan Trist, Lafayette (Sr., F)*

Defensive Player of the Year:
Luke Roh, Colgate (Sr., G)

Coach of the Year:
Dave Paulsen, Bucknell

Freshman of the Year:
Kahron Ross, Lehigh (Fr., G)

SEC

Player of the Year:
Bobby Portis, Arkansas

First-Team All-Conference:
Bobby Portis, Arkansas
Willie Cauley-Stein, Kentucky
Karl-Anthony Towns, Kentucky  
Jarell Martin, LSU
Jordan Mickey, LSU
Stefan Moody, Ole Miss
Josh Richardson, Tennessee
Danuel House, Texas A&M
Damian Jones, Vanderbilt

Defensive Player of the Year:
Willie Cauley-Stein, Kentucky

Coach of the Year:
John Calipari, Kentucky

Freshman of the Year:
Karl-Anthony Towns, Kentucky  

Southern

Player of the Year:
Karl Cochran, Sr., G, Wofford

First-Team All-Conference:
Ashton Moore, The Citadel
Jalen Riley, ETSU
Stephen Croone, Furman
Darious Moten, Mercer
Ike Nwamu, Mercer
Casey Jones, Chattanooga
Justin Tuoyo, Chattanooga
James Sinclair, Western Carolina
Karl Cochran, Wofford
Lee Skinner, Wofford

Defensive Player of the Year:
Justin Tuoyo, So., F, Chattanooga

Coach of the Year:
Mike Young, Wofford

Freshman of the Year:
Devin Sibley, G, Furman

Southland

Player of the Year:
Thomas Walkup, Stephen F. Austin

First-Team All-Conference:
Thomas Walkup, Stephen F. Austin
Jalan West, Northwestern St.
Denzel Livingston, UIW
Desharick Guidry, McNeese St.
John Jordan, A&M Corpus Christi

Defensive Player of the Year:
Michael Holyfield, Sam Houston St

Coach of the Year:
Brian Underwood, Stephen F. Austin

Freshman of the Year:
Jordan Howard, Central Arkansas

SWAC

Player of the Year:
Mandarious Gibbs, G, Texas Southern

First-Team All-Conference:
Mandarious Gibbs, G, Texas Southern
Jamel Waters, G, Alabama State
LeAntwan Luckett, F, Alcorn State
Marquis Vance, F, Alcorn State
Nick West, C, Alabama A&M

Defensive Player of the Year:
Reggis Onwukamuche, Prairie View

Coach of the Year:
Mike Davis, Texas Southern

Freshman of the Year:
Steve Rogers, Alabama State

Summit

Player of the Year:
Lawrence Alexander, North Dakota State

First-Team All-Conference:
Lawrence Alexander, North Dakota State    G    Sr.
Obi Emegano, Oral Roberts    G    Jr.
Steve Forbes, Fort Wayne    F    Sr.
Cody Larson, South Dakota State    F    Sr.
Tyler Larson, South Dakota    G    Sr.
Deondre Parks, South Dakota State    G    Jr.

Defensive Player of the Year:
Cody Larson, South Dakota State

Coach of the Year:
David Richman, North Dakota State

Sun Belt

Player of the Year:
R.J. Hunter, G, Georgia State

First-Team All-Conference:
R.J. Hunter, G, Georgia State
Jelani Hewitt, G, Georgia Southern
Ryan Harrow, G, Georgia State
Shawn Long, F, UL Lafayette
Tylor Ongwae, F, UL Monroe

Defensive Player of the Year:
Jelani Hewitt, G, Georgia Southern

Coach of the Year:
Keith Richard, UL Monroe

Freshman of the Year:
Wesley Person, G, Troy

WCC

Player of the Year:
Kevin Pangos, G, Gonzaga

First-Team All-Conference:
Kevin Pangos, G, Gonzaga
Jared Brownridge, G, Santa Clara
Kerry Carter, G, St. Mary’s
Kyle Collinsworth, G, BYU
Stacy Davis, F, Pepperdine
Johnny Dee, G, San Diego
Tyler Haws, G, BYU
Przemek Karnowski, C, Gonzaga
Brad Waldow, C, St. Mary’s
Kyle Wiltjer, F, Gonzaga

Defensive Player of the Year:
Gary Bell, Jr., G, Gonzaga

Coach of the Year:
Mark Few, Gonzaga

Freshman of the Year:
Damontas Sabonis (Only Freshmen named to 1st of 2nd team. WCC provides an All-Frosh team)

WAC

Player of the Year:
Martez Harrison, Missouri-Kansas City

First-Team All-Conference:
Aly Ahmed, C, Bakersfield
Martez Harrison, G, Missouri-Kansas City
Daniel Mullings, G, New Mexico State
Pascal Siakam, F, New Mexico State
Isiah Umipig, G, Seattle U

Coach of the Year:
Marvin Menzies, New Mexico State

Freshman of the Year:
Pascal Siakam, New Mexico State